Monday, July 14, 2014

A Monday Mystery Moment with Flavia de Luce

There is a special place in my heart for all things British. Part of it is that a good chunk of my heritage is British. Among my ancestors are Featherstones and Paxtons with some Scottish Cunninghams for additional flair. I love the droll humor of British romantic comedies (Love Actually or Bridget Jones' Diary are some faves), as well as their productions of all things Jane Austen (Pride and Prejudice , anyone?) There's a dry humor and willingness to be downright silly that I enjoy, because so often one is not quite sure if they intended to be silly or clever or if they're just being ironic.
Family motto: "Over, fork over!"
Yes, really.
And so it should be no surprise to anyone that while the English take their tea very seriously, there are those who have to infuse their humor into that arena as well, with delightful results. TeaPigs is a British company who love their tea and loves their fun and have made it their mission to combine the two. Even their name, "Teapigs" came about from a brainstorming session where someone made the remark that they're pigs about their tea (meaning they can't get enough and just want more and more). The name stuck. And their love of fun certainly makes an impression. Teapigs Darjeeling Earl Grey   has an image of a little grey dachsund on the package, but don't let their love of fun be mistaken for lack of standards. In this case, they've taken something that is a common and well-loved classic (Earl Grey) and elevated it. Using Darjeeling as the base tea, there's something special and surprising that takes place in your cup. It's the flavor of the Earl Grey that we know and love, but it's a little bit more. Each element of the tea is raised to a new level. Tea with a twist.



Which is what I like about British mystery novels as well. They are often good, old fashioned, comfortable mysteries with a twist.

July happens to be one of those months during the year where every second feels like it is scheduled. There is no down time. There is no stopping. It is go-go-go. And so, in those moments when I finally force myself to go and eat some lunch I tend to reach for something comfortable and familiar, where I can allow someone else to have to do all the thinking and surmising. One of my go-to's is the  Flavia de Luce Novel Mystery series by Alan Bradley. It's your typical mystery series set in a quaint English village, with the usual police inspector playing his part, but the amateur sleuth here is not the usual fare. It's 11-year-old Flavia de Luce. Youngest of 3 sisters, her mother is believed to have died in a mountaineering accident when Flavia was still a baby. The girls live with their ever-grieving and stamp-collecting father in their mother's slowly deteriorating mansion, Buckshaw. Not only is Flavia 11-years old, she is also a chemistry genius who spends hours on end experimenting in her late uncle Tar's private chemistry lab where no one bothers her. Her scarily brilliant mind is evened out by her precocious antics, which are often carried out astride Gladys, her faithful bicycle. Book 1, in the series,The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie, has been read so many times, its spine is showing its popularity.


A few minutes of tea and sanity, and it's back to work. Something for me to look forward to: the next novel in the series has just come out, and I can't wait to learn more secrets about Harriet, Flavia's long-lost mother.